8 Sep 2011

    Feed The Animals Pt. II (Electric Zoo Review)

    Day 2:

    The second day was an early one for me and some of my friends. We arrived at 12:30 to an almost empty festival grounds to see SBTRKT who was playing in the Red Bull tent. Understanding that this wasn’t billed as one of SBTRKT’s live sets with his vocalist Sampha, I didn’t expect to just hear his self-titled album cover-to-cover (even though that is what I secretly was wishing for). Instead, we sat down to a bass-driven set that would fit in easily at a swanky NYC club like Le Bain (which we had the pleasure of going to that night, only to see the likes of Skrillex, 12th Planet, Alvin Risk, and Alex English running about).

    Unfortunately, nothing in SBTRKT’s set really captured my attention except for the occasional drop of one his originals. I was able to walk to the front and see the masked producer fire off loops/samples/beats from the APC40-looking MIDI controller, which was cool. Apart from that though, I still found myself wishing it was an ‘acoustic’ SBTRKT set. Another time I suppose.

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    4 May 2011

    This is a HUUUUUUUUGE lineup announcement. Let the feverish anticipation begin!!!

    This is a HUUUUUUUUGE lineup announcement. Let the feverish anticipation begin!!!

    19 Jan 2011

    The line-up for Coachella has been posted and is chuck-full of some of the top names in EDM, check it out!

    The line-up for Coachella has been posted and is chuck-full of some of the top names in EDM, check it out!

    26 Dec 2010

    Get 2 Know A DJ - The Bloody Beetroots/DC77

    "The dangerous freedom embedded in the performance of musical artists is a form of taking back one’s powers in the face of one’s apparent powerlessness."

     - Cornel West

    “Every day an artist gets up and knows he has to run. He has to run faster than the distant fragments of our time, faster than the voices hemming him in, telling him that however much he thinks,imagines, writes or comunicates, the system has already found a new way of drowning him out. Faster than the army of pretentious pinheads boasting artistic bollox, screaming their cheapskate anger, selling out for twenty seconds of fame, filling their arses with gold so they can say I was there, applauding midgets dressed up as giants. He knows he has to chase ideals that have packed their bags And run off to the nearest tourist haven or tax haven and chase gods that ask for a discount on the rent on olympus and apartments with a view of the clouds because, if they look down, they say they get an urge to throw up. Down here, it’s all ours, it all belongs to men and women, but it’s common knowledge that we’ve never had a particular talent for doing things well. Every day an artist gets up and knows he has to run. What he doesn’t know, perhaps, is that he doesn’t have to run …alone.”

    BBR/DC77 Manifesto

         

                                

    The Bloody Beetroots (known as Death Crew 77 when performing as a band) are the quintessential rock stars of electronic music. Composed of Italian producers Sir Bob Cornelius Rifo and DJ Tommy Tea a.k.a “Isaac”, the Venom-masked duo have been annihilating audiences since 2006 with their devastating blend of electro-metal. The group is best-known for their insane track Warp 1.9, which gets even the most complacent crowds thrashing like lost souls being dragged to hell.  However BBR/DC77 is more than a one-trick pony. Their album, Romborama, is a dynamic compilation of humor, rage, despair, anarchy, depravity, and sin. They are by far the most energized performers in electronic music (w/Rusko being a close second, haha). I’ve never experienced a more intense display of raw emotion than when I attended one of their concerts last October. You have to submit to the will of the music and let your body be controlled by the crowd. Simply put, resistance is futile. But why would you even want to resist when you’re having such an incredible time? 

    I’m such an avid fan of BBR/DC77 because I believe they accomplish more than just playing music. They have a message that they are trying to express in the music that they create, partially revealed through their manifesto above. More importantly though, the mere act of people showing up to be a part of these anarchic spectacles, illuminates many truths about our generation’s feelings of frustration and indignation towards their position in modern society. This doesn’t only apply to BBR/DC77. To me, much of the new-gen rave culture is about an escape from this disillusionment.

    Open your ears. Open your mind.